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Emergency Care Updates

Emergency Care
Updates

This page is intended for Healthcare Professionals Only

Nose Bleeding…evidence based practice
  1. Gauze ribbons, nasal tampons and nasal balloon catheters all appear to be equally effective in controlling epistaxis, however, the nasal tampons and balloon catheters appear to be less time consuming and easier to insert. 
  2. Most patients discharged with nasal packing should follow-up with an  ENT physician within 48-72 hours to reduce potential complications. Most patients with anterior nasal packing do not require antibiotic prophylaxis as the incidence of Toxic shock syndrome is very low.
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Start Peripheral Vasopressors Early in Shock!

It has been dogmatically believed that prolonged infusion of any vasopressor mandates placement of a central line.  However, available evidence doesn’t support this.

  1. Diluted solutions of all catecholamines are safe (except Vasopressin) to be administered peripherally via a well functioning 18-20G IV or larger in forearm (no hand/wrist/AC) .
  2. No old IVs (>72 hrs)
  3. Know how to treat extravasation
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The Red Eye

A red or painful eye is a common presentation in the emergency department, and the rapid identification and management of potentially sight-threatening causes is critical.

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Emergency Topics