Intimate Partner Violence

Every 6 days a woman is killed at the hands of her partner. Victims of intimate partner violence and domestic violence that we see in the ED typically involve an abuse story of repeated escalating violence over time that ends up in a crisis situation.

Universal Screening for Intimate Partner Violence

Start with a normalizing statement

“Because violence is so common in many women’s lives and because there’s help available for women being abused, I now ask every patient about domestic violence.”

The Partner Violence Screen

  1. Have you been hit, kicked, slapped, punched or otherwise hurt by someone in the past year?
  2. Do you feel safe in your current relationship?
  3. Is there a partner from a previous relationship who is making you feel unsafe now?

 

Top 10 Posts of 2017

Mistakes that Kill during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

  • Too Slow or Too Fast Chest Compressions
  • Too Shallow or Too Deep Chest Compressions
  • Too Many or Too Slow Breaths
  • Leaning on the Chest
  • Too Many Interruptions
  • Giving Up Too Soon
  • Too Slow Adaptation


 

Oxygen Bubble Bottles or Bacteria Swimming Pools?

Humidified oxygen is widely administered in hospitals and EMS vehicles and this is presumed to alleviate nasal and oral discomfort in the non-intubated patient. Humidification of supplemental oxygen is commonly delivered by bubbling oxygen through either cold or warm sterile water before it reaches the patient. However, the effect on patient comfort is negligible. Bubble humidifiers may, however, represent an infection hazard and should not be used.

 


 

Anaesthesia, Trauma & Critical Care

 

 


 

WHO Emergency and Trauma Care e-Learning Training Course

A modular e-learning course that can easily be accessed by medical providers in an effort to improve emergency trauma care. Give it a try.

 


 

Guillain Barré Syndrome (GBS)


 

Surviving Sepsis Guidelines 2016: Recommendations and Best Practice Statements

 

 

 

Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection

 

 


 

2017 American Diabetes Association Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes

 

 


 

I am an Emergency Department doctor…I make mistakes

 

 


 

The Health Act 2017 – Emergency Care

 


 

Thank you for all the support in 2017. We look forward to providing you with even greater emergency care content in 2018. From all of us at the Emergency Medicine Kenya Foundation, HAPPY NEW YEAR!

And don’t’ forget…

 

The Health Act 2017 – Emergency Care

 

WHO Guidelines for essential trauma care

 

The Guidelines for essential trauma care seek to set achievable standards for trauma treatment services which could realistically be made available to almost every injured person in the world. They then seek to define the resources that would be necessary to assure such care. These include human resources (staffing and training) and physical resources (infrastructure, equipment, and supplies).

 

 

Management of Crush Injury/Syndrome

Crush syndrome is a life and limb-threatening condition that can occur as a result of entrapment of the extremities accompanied by extensive damage of a large muscle mass. It can develop following as little as 1 hour of entrapment. Effective medical care is required to reduce the risk of kidney damage, cardiac arrhythmia, and death. Management includes;

  • Fluids: IV fluid to provide 1L/h for 24 to 48 hours (depending on evacuation availability)
  • Equipment: ECG, laboratory tests for serum potassium and urine myoglobin, Foley catheter with graduated collection system, tourniquets
  • Medications: hyperkalemia
  • Manage Pain
  • Give Antibiotics
  • Continuous monitor with portable monitor; 15-minute to hourly vital signs, examination, urine output documented on flow sheet

 

Spinal Immobilization in Trauma Patients – The Facts

  • There is no high-level evidence that prehospital spinal immobilization positively impacts patient-oriented outcomes
    • Spinal Immobilization Does NOT Help Immobilize the Cervical Spine
    • Spinal Immobilization Does NOT Decrease Rates of Spinal Cord Injury
    • Spinal Immobilization Increases the Difficulty of Airway Management
    • Spinal Immobilization Can Cause Pressure Ulcers
    • Spinal Immobilization Changes the Physical Exam
    • Spinal Immobilization Worsens Pulmonary Function
    • Spinal Immobilization Increases Intracranial Pressure
  • There is no evidence that immobilizing awake, alert patients without deficits/complaints provides benefit
  • Selective spinal immobilization protocols can help identify patients at low risk for injury and avoid immobilization

 

9 Laws of Trauma

  1. “Any anomaly in your trauma patient is due to trauma, no matter how unlikely it may seem.”
  2. “Your trauma patient is bleeding to death until you prove otherwise. “
  3. “The only place an unstable trauma patient can go is to the OR.”
  4. “Even awake, alert, and stable patients die. And it hurts that much more when they do.”
  5. “A previously healthy child who is in arrest, or nearly so, is a victim of child abuse until proven otherwise.”
  6. “Always look at the image yourself.”
  7. “Your patient is at their healthiest as they roll in through the emergency department door”
  8. “Read the entire paper!”
  9. “Question everything!”