Road Traffic Crash Response & Emergency Medical Care

The utilisation of bystander training programs targeted at groups such as boda-boda riders and PSV drivers can assist in closing prehospital emergency care management gaps; while the creation of trauma centres institutes the first step in creating a trauma network to more efficiently address post-crash emergency care.

Tranexamic Acid

TXA is a safe, inexpensive medication that prevents fibrin breakdown.  In traumatic bleeding, it conveys a significant mortality benefit with an impressive NNT for mortality between 7 and 67, depending on injury severity, without apparent serious safety issues.  This benefit is associated with early administration.  TXA should not be given more than three hours after injury as it may increase mortality after this timeframe.  It appears to have equal benefit in a variety of trauma practice environments.

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CRASH-3 Trial: Tranexamic Acid in Mild-Moderate Head Injury

CRASH-3 Trial examined the effect of tranexamic acid on head injury-related death in adults with TBI who were within 3 h of injury, had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 12 or lower or any intracranial bleeding on CT scan, and no major
extracranial bleeding.

The results indicated a reduction in the risk of head injury-related death with tranexamic acid in patients with mild-to-moderate head injury (RR 0·78 [95% CI 0·64–0·95]) but in patients with severe head injury (0·99 [0·91–1·07]) there was no clear evidence of a reduction (p value for heterogeneity 0·030).

The effect of tranexamic acid on head injury-related death stratified by time to treatment and recorded no evidence of heterogeneity (p=0·96). The RR of head injury-related death with tranexamic acid was 0·96 (95% CI 0·79–1·17) in patients randomly assigned within 1 h of injury, 0·93 (0·85–1·02) in those randomly assigned within more than 1 h and 3 h or fewer after injury, and 0·94 (0·81–1·09) in those randomly assigned more than 3 h after injury.

Detecting Child Abuse in the Emergency Department

  1. When there is concern for physical abuse, the physical examination should be completed with the child undressed (in a gown), with specific attention to the skin, scalp and fontanel, mouth and oral cavity (including frena), ears, genitalia, and growth chart.
  2. Any injury in a preambulatory child, including bruises, mouth injuries, fractures, and intracranial or abdominal injury, should raise concern for abuse.
  3. The “TEN 4” rule: bruising of the Torso, Ears, or Neck in children <4 years old and any bruising in children <4 months old should raise concern.
  4. Radiographic skeletal survey should be performed using proper technique for children <2 years old with concern for abuse. Repeating the skeletal survey 2–3 weeks later can identify additional fractures that were not seen initially.
  5. Young (<2 years old) siblings and household contacts of abused children should be examined for abusive injuries and undergo skeletal survey.
  6. Infants evaluated for physical abuse may benefit from neuroimaging even if they don’t have neurological symptoms.
  7. Retinal examination is indicated for children with concern for abusive head trauma but may not be indicated for children without intracranial injury.
  8. Health care providers with a reasonable suspicion of physical abuse have a legal mandate to report their concern to child protective services.

Difficult Airway

  • MOANS – difficult BVM
  • LEMON – difficult laryngoscopy
  • The Two Minute Drill: How I Prep My Airways
  • The Bloody Airway: The Trauma Airway and the GI bleeder
  • The Obstructed Airway: Angioedema and Deep Space Infections

Dog Bite 101: The Ultimate Guide

  • Clean and evaluate the injury and remove damaged tissue
  • Close severe wounds with stitches or apply a bandage to minor bite injuries
  • Take radiographs if a foreign body or deep tissue injury is suspected
  • Recommend treatment for tetanus or rabies if indicated
  • Refer you to a specialist if there’s extensive damage or a joint is involved
  • Prescribe antibiotics to prevent infection

Psychological First Aid

About this course: Learn to provide psychological first aid to people in an emergency by employing the RAPID model: Reflective listening, Assessment of needs, Prioritisation, Intervention, and Disposition. This specialized course provides perspectives on injuries and trauma that are beyond those physical in nature. The RAPID model is readily applicable to public health settings, the workplace, the military, faith-based organisations, mass disaster venues, and even the demands of more commonplace critical events, e.g., dealing with the psychological aftermath of accidents, robberies, suicide, homicide, or community violence. In addition, the RAPID model has been found effective in promoting personal and community resilience.

Participants will increase their abilities to:

  • Discuss key concepts related to PFA
  • Listen reflectively
  • Differentiate benign, non-incapacitating psychological/ behavioural crisis reactions from more severe, potentially incapacitating, crisis reactions
  • Prioritize (triage) psychological/ behavioural crisis reactions
  • Mitigate acute distress and dysfunction, as appropriate
  • Recognise when to facilitate access to further mental health support
  • Practice self-care