ACLS REVISION: Post ROSC Care

Once we’ve achieved ROSC our job is not over. Good post-arrest care involves maintaining blood pressure and cerebral perfusion, adequate sedation, cooling and preventing hyperthermia, considering antiarrhythmic medications, optimization of tissue oxygen delivery while avoiding hyperoxia, getting patients to PCI who need it, and looking for and treating the underlying cause.

Hands-Only CPR – Videos

If you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, hands-only CPR is the recommended form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It not only increases the likelihood of surviving breathing and cardiac emergencies that occur outside of medical settings, but it’s simple to learn and easy to remember.

Neonatal Resuscitation

Most infants transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life without any assistance. The term-infant with good tone, color, and respiratory effort requires no assistance and should be handed off to the mother after birth. However, approximately 10% of infants require some resuscitation and about 1% require extensive resuscitation.  The main priority in neonatal resuscitation is establishment of effective ventilation and oxygenation.

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Where did the IV fluid go…

DID YOU KNOW: In managing shock, for every liter of normal saline given, only 180mls remains intravascular (your normal adult intravascular volume is approx. 5L). So in hypovolaemic patients…give loads of fluids…for blood loss, give blood early, the best natural colloid.

Hands-Only CPR – Poster

If you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, hands-only CPR is the recommended form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It not only increases the likelihood of surviving breathing and cardiac emergencies that occur outside of medical settings, but it’s simple to learn and easy to remember. For a refresher any time, you can print up this page and keep it with the rest of your first-aid supplies.

2020 American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC)

The 2020 Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC) are a comprehensive revision of the AHA’s guidelines for adult, pediatric, neonatal, resuscitation education science, and systems of care topics. They have been developed for resuscitation providers and AHA instructors to focus on the resuscitation science and guidelines recommendations that are most significant or controversial, or those that will result in resuscitation training and practice changes and provide the rationale for the recommendations.

Highlights

“Top 10 Changes” Project: CPR & ECC Guidelines Infographic Series

2020 AHA Algorithms