Orbital Cellulitis

Periorbital and Orbital Cellulitis can be difficult to distinguish from initially. Know that both have a good chance of improving with IV antibiotics. Not every child with preseptal/periorbital cellulitis requires a CT in the ED to rule-out orbital involvement. If there is no proptosis and normal eye movement, IV antibiotics may be sufficient. Hospitalization for close reassessments […]

Surviving Sepsis Guidelines 2021: Recommendations and Best Practice Statements

The recommendation for an initial fluid bolus of 30 mL/kg was downgraded from a strong recommendation to a weak recommendation, based on the low quality of evidence. However, resuscitation should start immediately. Balanced crystalloid solution (e.g., lactated Ringer’s solution) should be used (rather than normal saline) for resuscitation. Administration of vasopressors should be initiated via […]

A swallowed ‘timely’ emergency

A swallowed watch (button) battery can cause fatal perforation with mediastinitis if lodged in the oesophagus. The need to removed urgently under general anaesthesia makes this a ‘timely’ emergency.

Neonatal Resuscitation

Most infants transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life without any assistance. The term-infant with good tone, color, and respiratory effort requires no assistance and should be handed off to the mother after birth. However, approximately 10% of infants require some resuscitation and about 1% require extensive resuscitation.  The main priority in neonatal resuscitation is establishment […]

BRUE (previously Apparent Life Threatening Events) in Babies

BRUE is an event occurring in an infant <1 year of age when the observer reports a sudden, brief, and now resolved episode of ≥1 of the following: • cyanosis or pallor • absent, decreased, or irregular breathing • marked change in tone (hyper-or hypotonia) • altered level of responsiveness

Emergency Medicine Kenya Foundation