Infectious Diseases Society of America Guidelines on the Treatment and Management of Patients with COVID-19

COVID-19 is a pandemic with a rapidly increasing incidence of infections and deaths. Many pharmacologic therapies are being used or considered for treatment. Summarized below are the recommendations with comments related to the clinical practice guideline for the treatment and management of COVID-19.

Consensus guidelines for managing the airway in patients with COVID‐19

The predominant COVID‐19 illness is a viral pneumonia. Airway interventions are mainly required for tracheal intubation and establishing controlled ventilation. This consensus statement has been brought together at short notice to advise on airway management for patients with COVID‐19, drawing on published literature and immediately available information from clinicians and experts.

Influenza 2018

Guide for considering influenza testing when influenza viruses are circulating in the community (regardless of influenza vaccination history). 1Confirmation of influenza virus infection by diagnostic testing is not required for decisions to prescribe antiviral medication. Decision making should be based upon signs and symptoms consistent with influenza illness and epidemiologic factors. Initiation of empiric antiviral treatment should not be delayed while influenza testing results are pending. Antiviral treatment is clinically most beneficial when started as close to illness onset as possible. 2Signs and symptoms of uncomplicated influenza. 3Clinical manifestations and complications associated with influenza and persons who are at high risk of complications from influenza. 4All hospitalized patients with suspected influenza should be tested, as detection of influenza virus infection and prompt initiation of antiviral therapy are most clinically beneficial, and implementation of infection prevention and control measures is essential for prevention of nosocomial influenza outbreaks. 5Influenza testing may be used to inform decisions on use of antibiotics or continuation of antiviral medication, on need for further diagnostic tests, on consideration for home care, or on recommendations for ill persons living with others who are at high risk for influenza complications. 6Influenza testing may be required to inform decisions on infection control practices. 7Antiviral treatment is recommended for outpatients with suspected influenza who are at high risk for complications from influenza, or those with progressive disease not requiring hospital admission. Antiviral treatment of outpatients who are not at high risk for influenza complications can be considered based upon clinical judgment if presenting within 2 days of illness onset. Abbreviations: HF, heart failure; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.