10 reasons not to miss the Emergency Care Symposium 2017 – #ECSKenya2017

1. Kenya Is a Sickening Mess of a country

…I presumed he was about to be rushed to an emergency centre but to my surprise, all the onlookers were possibly there for the shock value.

 

2. Emergency Care…IT’S MAGIC!

 

3. #Emergency Care For Kenya

4. Kenya’s emergency medical services needs major work

Access to emergency care can be improved by better delivery at health facilities and the creation of new policies at a national level. Specifically, Kenya needs to recognise emergency services as an integral component of the healthcare system.

 

5. EMS in Kenya at work

6. The challenges of being a paramedic in Kenya

Lack of an effective national ambulance service in Kenya has seen private firms and organisations take the lead in providing medical emergency services across the country.

 

7. No One Shall Be ‘Denied Emergency Medical Treatment’ in Kenya: Opportunities, Challenges and Strategies

No One Shall Be ‘Denied Emergency Medical Treatment’ in Kenya: Opportunities, Challenges and Strategies

Odundo Collins Odhiambo

Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc

 

 

8. Access to quality emergency services in Kenya

 

Access to quality emergency services is an essential component of the human right to health, but barriers to emergency care are found throughout Africa and the wider world. Data to support the development of emergency care are essential to improve access to care and further infrastructure development. We undertook this study to understand the community’s emergency care needs and the barriers they face when trying to access care and to engage community members in developing high impact solutions to expand access to essential emergency services.

To accomplish this, we used a qualitative research methodology to conduct 59 focus groups with 528 total Kenyan community member participants. Data were coded, aggregated, and analysed using the content analysis approach. Participants were uniformly selected from all eight of the historical Kenyan provinces (Central, Coast, Eastern, Nairobi, North Eastern, Nyanza, Rift Valley, and Western), with equal rural and urban community representation.

We found that socioeconomic and cultural factors play a major role both in seeking and reaching emergency care. Community members in Kenya experience a wide range of medical emergencies and seem to understand their time-critical nature. They rely on one another for assistance in the face of substantial barriers to care: a lack of a structured system, resources, transportation, trained healthcare providers, and initial care on scene.

The results of this study indicate the need for specific interventions to reduce barriers to access essential emergency services in Kenya. Access to emergency care can be improved by encouraging recognition and initial treatment of emergent illness in the community, strengthening the prehospital care system, improving emergency care delivery at health facilities, nd creating new policies at both county and national levels.

 

9. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in Kenya

 

10. Car accident survivor spends over 18 hours waiting in ambulance

 

Luca Saraceno tells how doctor wife died on Westlands road as crowd stared

 

I wish that one day I may see many public ambulances running through the streets of Nairobi rescuing its citizens in need of urgent care, I wish I may be finally sure that quality basic and referral health services are provided to all citizens, regardless of their census and status and in a way that truly prevents death and suffering. On that day, hopefully not too far, I will hold my daughter’s hand and I will tell her: “Believe me, my daughter, your mum died like a hero. You need to know that your mum wished all of this, and you need to trust me when I say that she contributed as much as she could for this to happen, not only during in life but also through her death”.

 

Pre-hospital Management of Spinal Injuries: Backboard Myths

Spine Board Myths

  1. The Backboard should not be used as a therapeutic intervention. Achieving full spinal immobilization is not possible and its use has been shown to cause patient harm and no benefit. Instead, spinal motion restriction should be practiced.
  2. Backboard use has been shown to cause increased pressure ulcers, decreased respiratory function, increased back pain, and result in a false-positive midline vertebral tenderness. This can result in unnecessary testing, radiation exposure and medical costs.
  3. Penetrating trauma alone does not increase the risk of cervical spine injury and these patients should never be immobilized.
  4. Attempting spinal motion restriction should not delay life-saving interventions or delay transport to definitive care.
  5. Remove backboards in the emergency department to avoid complications of prolonged, unnecessary immobilization.

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