Kenya Emergency Medical Care Policy 2020-2030

The Ministry of Health, today, launched the Kenya Emergency Medical Care (EMC) Policy 2020-2030, to promote healthcare among citizens in need of emergency treatment. The Kenya Emergency Medical Care (EMC) Policy 2020-2030 is the first-ever policy in Kenya that seeks to establish a working Emergency Medical Care (EMC) System as a key component of the healthcare system in the country. The policy also speaks to the World Health Assembly resolution WHA 72.16 of 21 May 2019 which urged member states to create policies for sustainable funding, effective governance and universal access to safe, high-quality, needs-based emergency care for all as part of universal health coverage. In developing this policy, the Ministry of Health (MOH) aims to ensure access to the highest standards of emergency medical care in Kenya as envisioned in The Constitution of Kenya (2010) and the Health Act (2017) which guarantees every Kenyan the right to emergency medical treatment.

 

 

[CLICK TO DOWNLOAD]

5th African Conference on Emergency Medicine (#AfCEM20)

The 5th African Conference on Emergency Medicine (#AfCEM20) was an exclusively digital experience that engaged a diverse group of attendees from across Africa and other regions of the world.  

#AfCEM20 featured more than 500 emergency care professionals and hours of intensive education living up to its reputation as Africa’s largest emergency care educational event and the best place for networking and connecting to some of the most respected and known emergency care practitioners in Africa and the world. 

INVITATION CODE - AfCEM20Virtual

Loading...

Loading...

Partners

What does the law say about emergency medical treatment in Kenya?

  • Medical institutions that fail to provide health care services necessary to prevent and manage the damaging health effects due to an emergency situation are culpable.
  • Facilities that have systems that are inappropriately designed and invariably cause a patient deserving of emergency medical treatment not to receive such treatment, are also culpable.
  • Hospitals that prioritize monetary security prior to admission can also be held in violation of the Constitution as well as the Kenya National Patients’ Rights Charter.
  • The liability of the government arises from its duties as stipulated in the Constitution as well as sections 15 and 112 of the Health Act. Where the government thus fails to enact policies; mobilize financial resources, regulate, train and accredit emergency care providers or ensure compliance with already existing guidelines by medical institutions, then it is liable in law. This, must, of course, be done in consultation with county governments and other stakeholders in the health sector acknowledging that health is now a devolved function.