Emergency Hotlines

Emergency Hotlines establish a reliable fixed-line system that is able to improve emergency care and reduce mortality and morbidity through improved communication and collaboration with emergency care centres.

Effective Positioning of Emergency Care Centres in Kenya

In order to provide quality emergency care, emergency care centres need to be developed with an understanding of current geographical disparities and careful planning to create a network of emergency care centres that is sufficient to meet the needs of the population. This is key to ensure country-wide access to emergency care within the “golden hour” window.

Defining Emergency Care Centres across Kenya

Emergency care is a key component of any healthcare system in protecting the health of a population and preventing mortality and morbidity. Right to emergency care is protected in Kenya, but in order to optimise this, there must be the promotion of a common language and universal knowledge.

Access to emergency services an uphill task despite tough laws

 

Both the Constitution 2010 and the Health Act 2017 state that nobody should be denied emergency medical treatment.

This includes pre-hospital care, stabilising the patient, and arranging for referral in cases where the health provider of first call does not have the facilities necessary to stabilise the patient.

Emergency treatment, according to the African Federation for Emergency Medicine, is the provision of initial resuscitation, stabilisation, and treatment to acutely ill and injured patients, and delivery of those patients to the best available definitive care, regardless of ability to pay.

 

“More accident and emergency centres are required”, President Kenyatta

President Kenyatta takes action after a secret visit to KNH (Courtesy)

President Uhuru Kenyatta has taken action after he made a secret visit to Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH)

The president who was speaking to the team tasked with regenerating Nairobi city co-chaired by Governor Mike Sonko and Tourism CS Najib Balala revealed that he made an anonymous visit to the National hospital and the state of the accidents and emergency centre was wanting.

He added that the center experiences too much pressure and more emergency centres are required in the city.

“More accident and emergency centres are required. You have to get these centres working,” said the President.

 

Prof. Lee A. Wallis – President IFEM at the Emergency Care Symposium 2017 (#ECSKenya2017)

Prof. Lee A. Wallis, President of the International Federation for Emergency Medicine, presents the keynote address at the Emergency Care Symposium at Safari Park

“We don’t expect that every patient who needs emergency care will be seen by Emergency physician specialists…. they are not the solution to the emergency care problem…. the system is completely dependent on community-based first aid responders, clinics and low-level hospitals like district hospitals, nurses, clinical officers mid-level workers and generalist doctors who go from seeing emergencies with no training to dealing with emergencies properly trained. That is the transition we need to make”

“Our job is to save lives. It is therefore important to provide quality emergency care to all. Emergency care systems are the bedrock of good healthcare. For instance, if there was better emergency care at the scenes of traffic accidents, we could potentially save five hundred thousand lives in Africa annually.”