Access to emergency services an uphill task despite tough laws

 

Both the Constitution 2010 and the Health Act 2017 state that nobody should be denied emergency medical treatment.

This includes pre-hospital care, stabilising the patient, and arranging for referral in cases where the health provider of first call does not have the facilities necessary to stabilise the patient.

Emergency treatment, according to the African Federation for Emergency Medicine, is the provision of initial resuscitation, stabilisation, and treatment to acutely ill and injured patients, and delivery of those patients to the best available definitive care, regardless of ability to pay.

 

“More accident and emergency centres are required”, President Kenyatta

President Kenyatta takes action after a secret visit to KNH (Courtesy)

President Uhuru Kenyatta has taken action after he made a secret visit to Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH)

The president who was speaking to the team tasked with regenerating Nairobi city co-chaired by Governor Mike Sonko and Tourism CS Najib Balala revealed that he made an anonymous visit to the National hospital and the state of the accidents and emergency centre was wanting.

He added that the center experiences too much pressure and more emergency centres are required in the city.

“More accident and emergency centres are required. You have to get these centres working,” said the President.

 

Prof. Lee A. Wallis – President IFEM at the Emergency Care Symposium 2017 (#ECSKenya2017)

Prof. Lee A. Wallis, President of the International Federation for Emergency Medicine, presents the keynote address at the Emergency Care Symposium at Safari Park

“We don’t expect that every patient who needs emergency care will be seen by Emergency physician specialists…. they are not the solution to the emergency care problem…. the system is completely dependent on community-based first aid responders, clinics and low-level hospitals like district hospitals, nurses, clinical officers mid-level workers and generalist doctors who go from seeing emergencies with no training to dealing with emergencies properly trained. That is the transition we need to make”

“Our job is to save lives. It is therefore important to provide quality emergency care to all. Emergency care systems are the bedrock of good healthcare. For instance, if there was better emergency care at the scenes of traffic accidents, we could potentially save five hundred thousand lives in Africa annually.”

Emergency medical care shouldn’t be a preserve of the rich

 

Access to emergency medical care should not be for the privileged few who can afford private evacuation by road, sea or air. It should be available to all. A robust medical emergency response service should be a priority for our Ministry of Health. All our medical facilities must have the necessary infrastructure to support emergency care and we must train and continuously impart skills to our emergency medicine specialists of every cadre, to run these emergency rooms.

 

10 reasons not to miss the Emergency Care Symposium 2017 – #ECSKenya2017

1. Kenya Is a Sickening Mess of a country

…I presumed he was about to be rushed to an emergency centre but to my surprise, all the onlookers were possibly there for the shock value.

 

2. Emergency Care…IT’S MAGIC!

 

3. #Emergency Care For Kenya

4. Kenya’s emergency medical services needs major work

Access to emergency care can be improved by better delivery at health facilities and the creation of new policies at a national level. Specifically, Kenya needs to recognise emergency services as an integral component of the healthcare system.

 

5. EMS in Kenya at work

6. The challenges of being a paramedic in Kenya

Lack of an effective national ambulance service in Kenya has seen private firms and organisations take the lead in providing medical emergency services across the country.

 

7. No One Shall Be ‘Denied Emergency Medical Treatment’ in Kenya: Opportunities, Challenges and Strategies

No One Shall Be ‘Denied Emergency Medical Treatment’ in Kenya: Opportunities, Challenges and Strategies

Odundo Collins Odhiambo

Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc

 

 

8. Access to quality emergency services in Kenya

 

Access to quality emergency services is an essential component of the human right to health, but barriers to emergency care are found throughout Africa and the wider world. Data to support the development of emergency care are essential to improve access to care and further infrastructure development. We undertook this study to understand the community’s emergency care needs and the barriers they face when trying to access care and to engage community members in developing high impact solutions to expand access to essential emergency services.

To accomplish this, we used a qualitative research methodology to conduct 59 focus groups with 528 total Kenyan community member participants. Data were coded, aggregated, and analysed using the content analysis approach. Participants were uniformly selected from all eight of the historical Kenyan provinces (Central, Coast, Eastern, Nairobi, North Eastern, Nyanza, Rift Valley, and Western), with equal rural and urban community representation.

We found that socioeconomic and cultural factors play a major role both in seeking and reaching emergency care. Community members in Kenya experience a wide range of medical emergencies and seem to understand their time-critical nature. They rely on one another for assistance in the face of substantial barriers to care: a lack of a structured system, resources, transportation, trained healthcare providers, and initial care on scene.

The results of this study indicate the need for specific interventions to reduce barriers to access essential emergency services in Kenya. Access to emergency care can be improved by encouraging recognition and initial treatment of emergent illness in the community, strengthening the prehospital care system, improving emergency care delivery at health facilities, nd creating new policies at both county and national levels.

 

9. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) in Kenya

 

10. Car accident survivor spends over 18 hours waiting in ambulance