Dog Bite 101: The Ultimate Guide

  • Clean and evaluate the injury and remove damaged tissue
  • Close severe wounds with stitches or apply a bandage to minor bite injuries
  • Take radiographs if a foreign body or deep tissue injury is suspected
  • Recommend treatment for tetanus or rabies if indicated
  • Refer you to a specialist if there‚Äôs extensive damage or a joint is involved
  • Prescribe antibiotics to prevent infection

MBWA! Evidence based Dog Bite Management

  • It appears safe to close all dog bites regardless of location as long as they are < 8 hours old, and copious high-pressure irrigation
  • In patients with non-hand location dog bites, antibiotics are not needed if we leave the wound open for secondary repair.
  • If we primarily close the wound, we should continue to provide antibiotic prophylaxis until someone performs a randomized trial of primary closure +/- antibiotic prophylaxis.

 

Medical Myths in the Management of Dog Bites

  • It appears safe to close all dog bites regardless of location as long as they are < 8 hours old, and copious high-pressure irrigation
  • In patients with non-hand location dog bites, antibiotics are not needed if we leave the wound open for secondary repair.
  • If we primarily close the wound, we should continue to provide antibiotic prophylaxis until someone performs a randomized trial of primary closure +/- antibiotic prophylaxis.