Defibrillate then Give Adrenaline for IHCA

Guidelines recommend prompt defibrillation for treatment of in-hospital cardiac arrest due to an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation (or pulseless ventricular tachycardia) Epinephrine (adrenaline) is recommended only when patients remain in refractory ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia after many defibrillation attempts. Use of epinephrine before defibrillation is associated with lower odds of survival to discharge and of favourable neurological survival, probably due to lower odds of achieving return of spontaneous circulation

ACLS REVISION: Post ROSC Care

Once we’ve achieved ROSC our job is not over. Good post-arrest care involves maintaining blood pressure and cerebral perfusion, adequate sedation, cooling and preventing hyperthermia, considering antiarrhythmic medications, optimization of tissue oxygen delivery while avoiding hyperoxia, getting patients to PCI who need it, and looking for and treating the underlying cause.

Hands-Only CPR – Videos

If you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, hands-only CPR is the recommended form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It not only increases the likelihood of surviving breathing and cardiac emergencies that occur outside of medical settings, but it’s simple to learn and easy to remember.

Hands-Only CPR – Poster

If you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, hands-only CPR is the recommended form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It not only increases the likelihood of surviving breathing and cardiac emergencies that occur outside of medical settings, but it’s simple to learn and easy to remember. For a refresher any time, you can print up this page and keep it with the rest of your first-aid supplies.

2018 AHA PALS Update – Nothing New


The optimal sequence of PALS interventions, including administration of antiarrhythmic drugs during resuscitation, and the preferred manner and timing of drug administration in relation to shock delivery are still not known. One study reported a statistically significant improvement in return of spontaneous circulation when lidocaine administration was compared with amiodarone for pediatric ventricular fibrillation/pulseless ventricular tachycardia cardiac arrest. However, no difference in survival to hospital discharge was observed among patients who received amiodarone, lidocaine, or no antiarrhythmic medication.