Wellens’ Syndrome STEMI

What is Wellens’ Syndrome?

  1. History of Angina
  2. ECG Changes (T-wave Inversions/Biphasic T-waves in leads V2 – V4)
  3. Normal to Minimally elevated Cardiac Enzymes
  4. No pathologic precordial q waves
  5. No loss of precordial R wave progression


 

Shocking!!

The use of hands-on defibrillation (HOD) has been shown to expose the rescuer to voltages ranging from 827 V to ∼200 V, depending on cadaver and anatomic location. The rescuer-received dose (RRD) under the test scenarios ranged from 1 to 8 J, which is in excess of accepted energy exposure levels.

Shock, syncope, sweating… and severe chest pain!

A 67-year old male is brought to hospital following an episode of syncope at home. He had just finished eating lunch at home when he developed severe crushing retrosternal chest pain radiating to his left arm, profuse sweating and vomiting. Shortly after the onset of the pain he lost consciousness and awoke to find himself on the floor. En route, he has several brief episode of dizziness and an impalpable radial pulse.


Latest guidelines for the management of STEMI patients

Practice Guideline |

2013 ACCF/AHA Guideline for the Management of ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013;61(4):e78-e140.