Luca Saraceno tells how doctor wife died on Westlands road as crowd stared

 

I wish that one day I may see many public ambulances running through the streets of Nairobi rescuing its citizens in need of urgent care, I wish I may be finally sure that quality basic and referral health services are provided to all citizens, regardless of their census and status and in a way that truly prevents death and suffering. On that day, hopefully not too far, I will hold my daughter’s hand and I will tell her: “Believe me, my daughter, your mum died like a hero. You need to know that your mum wished all of this, and you need to trust me when I say that she contributed as much as she could for this to happen, not only during in life but also through her death”.

 

Kenya’s emergency medical services needs major work

Access to emergency care can be improved by better delivery at health facilities and the creation of new policies at a national level. Specifically, Kenya needs to recognise emergency services as an integral component of the healthcare system.

 

Emergency hospital care in Kenya is designed to kill accident victims

 

Disturbing reports in the media of patients succumbing to easily preventable deaths is so sickening that one is left scratching the head for answers.

Some cases are so bizarre that cynics are even tempted to question the mental status of the health workers involved. Do they lack the skill set for the job they were employed to do? Is it a case of too much workload, lack of resources or plain apathy?

 

Quiet Fortitude in the ER

“It takes someone comfortable in their skin to work in the overcrowded, under-resourced safety net of a failed system, where they will never achieve the idolatry of the sub-specialist, or perhaps even credit when their work succeeds. But quietly, emergency physicians are always there, for anyone, any time.”