A living WHO guideline on drugs for COVID-19

This living guideline responds to emerging evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on existing and new drug treatments for covid-19. More than 2800 trials on covid-19 interventions have been registered or are ongoing. Among these are large national and international platform trials (such as RECOVERY, WHO SOLIDARITY, and DISCOVERY) that recruit large numbers of patients, with a pragmatic and adaptive design. These platform trials are currently investigating and reporting on drugs such as antiviral monoclonal antibodies and immunomodulators. This rapidly evolving evidence landscape requires trustworthy interpretation and expeditious clinical practice guidelines to inform clinicians, patients, governments, ministries, and health administrators.

Priapism

 Non-ischemic (high-flow)Ischemic (low-flow)
Physical ExamTypically painless, not fully tumescentPainful, fully tumescent with corpus cavernosa rigidity without involvement of corpus spongiosum and glans penis
AetiologyHigh-flow priapism is extremely rare and most commonly associated with antecedent trauma including blunt trauma, or resulting from needle injury of the cavernosal artery.Low-flow priapism is caused by impaired relaxation and/or paralysis of cavernosal smooth muscle and in sickle-cell disease
ManagementNOT EmergencyEmergency
 
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A swallowed ‘timely’ emergency

A swallowed watch (button) battery can cause fatal perforation with mediastinitis if lodged in the oesophagus. The need to removed urgently under general anaesthesia makes this a ‘timely’ emergency.

ACLS REVISION: Post ROSC Care

Once we’ve achieved ROSC our job is not over. Good post-arrest care involves maintaining blood pressure and cerebral perfusion, adequate sedation, cooling and preventing hyperthermia, considering antiarrhythmic medications, optimization of tissue oxygen delivery while avoiding hyperoxia, getting patients to PCI who need it, and looking for and treating the underlying cause.

Hands-Only CPR – Videos

If you see a teen or adult suddenly collapse, hands-only CPR is the recommended form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). It not only increases the likelihood of surviving breathing and cardiac emergencies that occur outside of medical settings, but it’s simple to learn and easy to remember.