Management of Upper GI Bleeding

The first step in managing an acute upper GI bleed is to stabilize the patient with airway and volume restoration. An acidic environment promotes platelet disaggregation, fibrinolysis, and impairs clot formation, hence the utility of using PPI therapy. There is no proven mortality benefit to using PPI therapy, although it is still commonly used in practice. Early upper endoscopy within 24 hours of presentation is recommended in most patients because it confirms the diagnosis and allows for targeted treatment.

Trauma research 2014-2015

  1. The headline here is that those with an extradural and fixed dilated pupils have a >50% chance of a good neurological recovery. Please, please, please aggressively manage these patients and avoid any nihilism as a result of this pupilary sign.
  2. Give Tranexamic acid to all patients with massive bleeding within 3 hours of trauma
  3. Use Ketamine for all trauma intubation so

DID YOU KNOW: Peritonitis

Determining the presence or absence of peritonitis is a primary objective of the abdominal examination. All the methods alone are inaccurate. Thoracic inflammatory process adjacent to the diaphragm, a voluntary contraction of the abdominal wall in apprensive patients, a rough painful examination, may be misleading. But what is more interesting is that NO TEST ALONE is useful in ruling out a diagnosis of peritonitis. Furthermore a gentle percussion is as inaccurate as the rebound test is, but it saves unnecessary pain.

It’s getting cold so here’s a review of carbon monoxide poisoning

“Symptoms are variable and physical exam and pulse-oximetry are unreliable. Maintain high level of suspicion with emphasis on historical factors. Start the patient on O2 as soon as the diagnosis is suspected.”