UTI Myths

Urine-Infection-in-Dogs-and-Cats

Myth 1: The Urine Is Cloudy and Smells Bad. My Patient Has a UTI

Myth 2: The Urine Has Bacteria Present. My Patient Has a UTI. Also See Myth 8

Myth 3: My Patient’s Urine Sample Has >5 Squamous Epithelial Cells per Low-Power Field and the Culture is Positive. Because the Culture is Positive, I Can Disregard the Epithelial Cell Count and Treat the UTI

Myth 4: The Urine Has Positive Leukocyte Esterase. My Patient Should Have a Urine Culture Performed, Has a UTI, and Needs Antibiotics

Myth 5: My Patient Has Pyuria. They Must Have a UTI

Myth 6: The Urine Has Nitrates Present. My Patient Has a UTI

Myth 7: All Findings of Bacteria in a Catheterized Urine Sample Should Be Diagnosed as a UTI

Myth 8: Patients with Bacteriuria Will Progress to a UTI and Should Therefore Be Treated

Myth 9: Falls and Acute Altered Mental Status Changes in the Elderly Patient Are Usually Caused by UTI

Myth 10: The Presence of Yeast or Candida in the Urine, Especially in Patients with Indwelling Urinary Catheters, Indicates a Candida UTI and Needs to Be Treated

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Vasopressors for Septic Shock

  • Epinephrine and norepinephrine are both acceptable, evidence-based approaches to hemodynamic support in septic shock.
  • Individual patient responsiveness to vasopressors is variable and unpredictable.
  • Some patients respond better to epinephrine than norepinephrine.
  • For patients who are not responding well to norepinephrine, it is reasonable to empirically trial a low dose of epinephrine (“epinephrine challenge”).

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